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How To Treat Water When Travelling On An Expedition

HOW TO TREAT WATER WHEN TRAVELING ON AN EXPEDITION

Why do all the troubles related to water treatment come to the picnic? The answer is because it's not easy to make sure the clear stream near your campsite is clean or full of pathogenic bacteria. If animals, including humans, can make it to the surface, the water in that area is sure to be full of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. You may come across people who claim to be sure they used to drink spring water when camping many times and that's okay. Those are just lucky cases because they have a particularly good immune system. These people, of course, will still have latent bacteria in their bodies and take them with them wherever they go.

Treating drinking water from anywhere in the habit of most people who have experience in field trips. The article will give an overview and notes when treating water during field trips. For more information about treatment options when traveling abroad, see more information in the article How to treat water when traveling abroad.


POTENTIAL HAZARDS FROM WATER

Any source of water on Earth can contain pathogens, which are born when the water is contaminated by human or animal wastes. Just absorb about 10 pathogenic microorganisms is enough for humans to have diarrhea or other symptoms of dehydration

Some pathogens can survive monthly in the environment, including the following three main types:

Bacteria include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Salmonella, Campylobacter (types of bacteria that cause intestinal diseases) and many others. These medium-sized microorganisms are also easily filtered out of water.

Protozoa include Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia (causing diarrhea). These unicellular animals have hard outer cysts that help protect them from external chemical influences. However, the relatively large size makes them easily filtered out of the water.

Viral organisms include Hepatitis A (hepatitis A), Rotavirus (acute diarrhea in children) and norovirus (causing vomiting). Because viral organisms are much smaller than protozoa and bacteria, it is difficult to filter them out of the water. Strictly speaking, the elimination or neutralization of viral organisms is the process of "purifying" water.

Tip: Always carry a backup filter system in case the filter is lost; Out of battery or malfunction. Using chemicals is also a way to treat water without carrying bulky items. Boiling water is the surest alternative when the filter is broken: boil water and let boil for about 1 minute (3 minutes if you are at an altitude of 2000m).

WATER SOURCES MAY BE OBTAINED

The water sources have high usability:

- Streams, especially if the water is a stream or a river. Flows will prevent the growth of moss or microorganisms. In addition, mosquitoes do not lay eggs in areas with strong currents.

- If no strong current can be found, look for still water (lakes, ponds, slow-flowing streams) and not much mud. Clean water flows through the filter faster and is less clogged.

- An offshore location that you can reach. This place is usually less concentrated microorganisms than coastal areas.

Tip: After a heavy rain, wait for a while before taking out the filtered water. Falling rainwater raises the water level of rivers and lakes, but dirt on the ground is also washed down, increasing the number of bacteria and mud in the water.

Signs of danger of water sources:

These are signs of an unclean water source. If you experience these signs, look for another source of water. If not, follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully to filter the purest water as possible:

- Water (especially low-rise water) near pasture areas where animals feed or near campsites.

- Signs of a passing herd of wild animals or livestock.

- Traces of unclean or human activities.

- Foam or brown foam in large numbers is a sign of moss. Although they are not dangerous, they show that the nutrient-rich water environment for microorganisms thrives.

- Dirty snow indicates the presence of humans. Also don't think snow-white-white is "safe", because bacteria can survive for months in icy conditions.

HOW TO GET WATER

The most important thing when getting water to filter is to find the cleanest water possible. The leaves, moss, and mud do not harm but make the water filtration process more difficult. If mud in the water cannot be avoided, try the following:

Get water near the surface: Use a small pot and scoop water near the surface, or where there is a little dirt as possible. Place the pot in place until the sediment settles to the bottom. Take care not to stir the residue gently to get the cleanest water.

Use a pre-filter: If you use a water filter, the suction mouth will often have a pre-filter, which will filter out large debris from intrusion and affect the internal filter. A pre-filter is even more important if you treat the water with UV light, and is often sold as an accessory. If you do not have a strainer, use a cloth or thin cloth.

Use a pre-filter: If you use a water filter, the suction mouth will often have a pre-filter, which will filter out large debris from intrusion and affect the internal filter. A pre-filter is even more important if you treat the water with UV light, and is often sold as an accessory. If you do not have a strainer, use a cloth or thin cloth.

Many diseases seem to be caused by water, but they are actually due to poor hygiene and hygiene, so clean your hands before eating and drinking. Bring hand sanitizer and use regularly, especially after each toilet. Washing your hands before preparing food, before dipping your hands into clean water and after touching natural water is also a good habit.

RULE "DO NOT LET THE SEAL"

Careful water treatment is a way to preserve the natural water. Today, as more and more people go on a picnic, each of us needs to exemplify ourselves by observing the Rule of "Leaving no marks." Here are some guidelines regarding the preservation of water quality in natural areas.

 - Camping at least 60m away from water.

 - Dispose of garbage in place, at least 60m away from water sources.

 - Bring water for personal hygiene and place the toilet at least 60m from the water source.

 - Do not use or throw soap directly into the water. This is to prevent the growth of microorganisms in the water.

 - Drain soapy water by pouring it slowly into the soil rather than onto rocks. Microorganisms living in the soil can break down the dirt.